The Honor Bell and Veterans Courts

The Honor Bell and Veterans Courts

The Honor Bell Foundation has partnered with several Colorado judicial districts who operate veterans courts. These are a type of problem-solving court designed to serve justice-involved military and former-military members with substance abuse and mental health needs through intensive supervision and treatment. Find out more here.

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Honor Bell Participates in Dedication of New Veterans Administration Medical Building

Honor Bell Participates in Dedication of New Veterans Administration Medical Building

Last Saturday we were honored to take part in the dedication of the Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado Health Center. We tolled the Honor Bell in memory of our founder, Louis Olivera, and in memory of all other deceased veterans in Colorado. See photos from the event here.

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Give thanks to a vet in your life with a recurring gift to the Honor Bell Foundation

Give thanks to a vet in your life with a recurring gift to the Honor Bell Foundation

We all know at least one person who has served in our nation's armed forces, and in keeping the spirit of Veterans Day going through the entire month of November, we are offering a chance for you to honor the vet in your life with a recurring donation to the Honor Bell Foundation. 

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Join the Bell Honor Guard: Stewards of Respect, Comrades-in-arms

An elite corps of volunteers known as the Bell Honor Guard is now open to all veteran volunteers and members of Colorado’s Veterans Service Organizations. The Bell Guard will toll the Honor Bell in final tribute to their brothers and sisters at funeral services. Becoming a member of the Bell Guard allows veterans from all branches of service, generations, and conflicts to work together toward a common goal.

“Since leaving the Army 25 years ago, I realize I feel best when I'm interacting with fellow veterans. That camaraderie is felt again when I work as a team to honor those that severed as I did.” –Lou Olivera

Working as a true team, the Bell Guard will be composed of several tolling parties, each with three members: the Belladier, the Bell Guard, and the Bell Major. The Belladier is responsible for rendering Bell Honors (tolling the Honor Bell seven times) and seeing that it is completed with dignity, honor and respect. In order to protect and preserve the sacrosanct purpose for which The Honor Bell was enshrined, the Bell Guard will stand at the ready to ensure that the Bell is not tolled except to render Bell Honors, and then only by the Belladier. The Bell Major is extremely important for successfully rendering Bell Honors: from the beginning to the completion of the tolling ceremony he or she is the eyes and ears of the Belladier. Using hand and arm signals, he or she will control the cadence, volume, and number of tolls to create a successful Bell Honors ceremony.

“The veterans we are burying today are made up of that small portion of the population who served their country with commitment and dedication. The Bell Honor Guard affords me the opportunity to recognize and honor their service.” –Bob Dawes

If you are a veteran —or know a veteran— looking for a way to help your fellow service members or give back to your community, we would love to have you join our team. Time commitments are expected to range from one to two days per month. All services will be held at Ft. Logan National Cemetery in the south Denver Metro Area.

Get involved

If you would like to be a part of this special team, please get in touch by filling out this short form, or by emailing david.marchand@honorbell.org. We would be honored to have you serve as one of the very first members of the Bell Honor Guard.

 

A Vet's Story: Bill Daniels

Bill Daniels on the wing of a Grumman F8F Bearcat.

Bill Daniels on the wing of a Grumman F8F Bearcat.

As a pioneer in cable television, Robert W. “Bill” Daniels left a large footprint on the landscape of Colorado business and industry after a distinguished career as a Naval aviator. Bill was born in Greeley, Colorado, in 1920. As a child, Bill and the Daniels family moved to Nebraska and Iowa, eventually settling in New Mexico. Bill excelled at the New Mexico Military Institute and was New Mexico’s Golden Gloves welterweight boxing champion two years in a row.

After high school, he enrolled in the Navy’s V-7 program, fast-tracking his training and allowing him to enter the Navy as a pilot in just 11 months. As a combat pilot, he flew a Grumman F4F Wildcat in the Allied Invasion of North Africa in 1942 and a Chance Vought Corsair in the Solomon Islands area of the Pacific theatre in 1943.

He was awarded the Bronze Star for “heroism, courage, and devotion to duty,” making repeated trips to rescue wounded shipmates after a Japanese kamikaze attack on the aircraft carrier USS Intrepid in November 1944. After war, he returned to private life, only to serve again during the Korean War, piloting a Grumman F9 Panther.

After the Korean War, he became one of the first people to get into the long-distance television broadcast business by setting up a microwave feed of local Denver broadcasting to Casper, Wyoming, where it was distributed through his cable television network. He expanded into the brokering and financing side of the cable television business, with Daniels and Associates becoming one of the largest firms in the field by the mid-1960s. By 1988, Daniels’ cable network was ranked among the top 25 multiple system operators in the United States.

Daniels, with his boxing background, retained a love of sports. Among the many sports interests he pursued, Daniels was co-owner of the Los Angeles Lakers as well as the American Basketball Association’s president. Daniels was very philanthropic, creating the Young American’s Bank and working with the University of Denver to integrate courses in business ethics, personal integrity, and values into the university’s business curriculum; the business school there now carries Daniels’ name. In 1997, Daniels created the Daniels Fund to invest in nonprofits throughout Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming (including the Honor Bell Foundation), as well as provide scholarships to college students in those states.

Bill believed that his wealth was best spent leaving a legacy and making a difference.  He served his country as a young man and later in life made a remarkable contribution to his community with his philanthropy and support of education.