Jim Wickham's Honor Bell Artifact

Jim Wickham

Jim Wickham

Jim Wickham served four years in the Navy beginning in 1958, and another 22 years in the Coast Guard. He was awarded several good conduct medals and a Bronze Star. In the Coast Guard Wickham specialized in communications as a Radioman, spending time in Vietnam on gun ships going up the small rivers that were too small for Naval vessels. He retired in 1982 as Chief, E7.

After service, Jim moved to Colorado to be a long haul trucker and be near his younger sister. He died in 2003.

Wickham's Cap Device

Wickham's Cap Device

Wickham's family donated his Coast Guard Cap Device for inclusion in the metal that was used to cast The Honor Bell.  

Richard Hawkins' Honor Bell Artifacts

Richard Hawkins

Richard Hawkins

Richard Hawkins was born 25 May, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. He always enjoyed sports and took up boxing at a young age. He joined the Army Air Corps in 1943, and served as a machine gunner during World War II; towards the end of the war he assisted in the liberation of concentration camps. He met Doris Letourneau, who was a sergeant in the Army, while he was a corporal, in Germany, marrying in Erding, Germany 4 months later. 

Hawkins was honorably discharged from the Army in 1946 and jumped at the chance to join the Air Force shortly thereafter. Richard was stationed throughout the world during his tenure in the Air Force: from Patrick AFB in Florida, to Itami and Kadina AFB in Japan. He was stationed in Phan Rang for a year during the Vietnam War. He and his family moved to Colorado in 1975 upon his retirement.

He was always very athletic and won 4 USAF Golden Glove boxing Championships under the fighting name "the Irish Kid". He was inducted into the Colorado Umpires Hall of Fame. He completed his Bachelor of Arts Degree at Metropolitan State College in 1981.

The artifacts donated by the Hawkins family.

The artifacts donated by the Hawkins family.

Richard's family has donated his American Campaign Medal from World War II, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, and a pair of Air Force cufflinks for inclusion in the metal that was cast into The Honor Bell. 

 

David Bucknam's Honor Bell Artifact

David and his wife, Susan, in 1966.

David and his wife, Susan, in 1966.

David Bucknam grew up in the Denver area, and had a passion for the outdoors which led him to backpack, climb, and explore every corner of Colorado’s wilderness. He met his future wife, Susan, as a member of the Colorado Mountain Club Juniors, when they were both teenagers.

David served in the US Army Reserve with the 224th Engineering Battalion at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, while completing his studies at the University of Colorado, from 1969 until 1976. He taught junior high history and geography for several years, worked for the Colorado Land Use Commission, and then for over 24 years with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. He retired as Director of the Office of Active and Inactive Mines. Under Dave’s leadership, Colorado’s Inactive Mine Reclamation Program and the Colorado Mine Safety and Training program were nationally recognized.

Bucknam's Sharpshooter badge with rifle bar

Bucknam's Sharpshooter badge with rifle bar

Bucknam's family donated his Sharpshooter badge with Rifle bar for inclusion in the metal used to cast The Honor Bell.

Robert Abbott, Jr.'s Honor Bell Artifacts

Robert R. Abbott Jr was born on August 5, 1941 in Bloomsburg, PA.  He enlisted in the Coast Guard in September of 1962. One of his tours was in Anchorage, Alaska, and was on duty as a radioman when the earthquake of March 27, 1964 hit. He spent time in St. Louis, Missouri doing duty on the Mississippi River. After four years in active duty he joined the Reserves.  He married in December of 1966 and moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota.  His assignment was along the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

With the GI Bill he finished his college degree and moved to Denver, Colorado, and joined the unit there. They worked Green River in Wyoming and Chatfield Reservoir in Denver. He retired on January 1, 2000 as a Chief Warrant Officer W-4 after 37 years of service. Two week duty in the summers were spent in various ports on the East and West Coast. He loved the game of golf and you would find him on the courses most every weekend even in the winter in Denver. He volunteered for many of the activities his daughters participated in. He passed away February 20, 2006 and was laid to rest at Fort Logan National Cemetery.  He is survived by his wife, Nancy, two daughters/son-in-laws, and five grandchildren.  

Robert's family donated a belt buckle from his Coast Guard uniform and a dog tag. Both were included in the metal used to cast The Honor Bell.